03/20/2019
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RALEIGH – The N.C. Pesticide Board recently approved the following settlement agreements for individuals in Johnston, Jones, New Hanover and Rowan counties, and Trenton, Ga. Settlements included instances of pesticide drift and selling restricted-use pesticides to individuals without a valid pesticide license.

Settlements are listed by county below:

  • (Columbus) Anthony R. Allred, general manager of Land O’Lakes Golf Course in Whiteville, agreed to pay $900 for using pesticides in a manner inconsistent with its labeling. Pesticides labeled for use on a farm were used to treat areas of the golf course. The agricultural pesticides used were not labeled for golf course use.
  • (Johnston) Joshua Daughtry of Kenly agreed to pay $600 for drift damage from a pesticide application on a soybean field to an adjacent vineyard. N.C. law states that no person shall apply pesticides under such conditions that drift from pesticide particles or vapors results in adverse effects.
  • (Jones) Patrick E. Faulkner II, manager of Crop Production Services in Trenton, agreed to pay $1,600 for making a restricted use pesticide available to a non-certified person.
  • (New Hanover) Gregory A. Lyon, owner and operator of Lyon-N-D-Grass in Carolina Beach, agreed to pay $800 for performing commercial pesticide applications at residential properties without a valid pesticide license and without the use of proper personal protective equipment. N.C. law states that no person shall engage in the business of pesticide applicator unless licensed annually by the N.C. Pesticide Board.
  • (Rowan) Jack O. George Jr., public pesticide operator for the N.C. Department of Transportation Environmental Landscapes Department, agreed to pay $1,000 for drift damage from a right-of-way pesticide application to a blueberry bush, fig tree and other plants on a residential property. N.C. law states that no person shall apply pesticides under such conditions that drift from pesticide particles or vapors results in adverse effects.
  • George R. Stone, a licensed commercial pesticide applicator for Stone Forestry Service in Trenton, Ga., agreed to pay $800 for a right-of-way pesticide application for Blue Ridge Electric in Murphy that was applied directly to a stream. N.C. law states that pesticide applicators should not operate in a faulty, careless of negligent manner or use any pesticide in a manner inconsistent with its labelling. The label instructions on the pesticides used in this case noted that the product was not to be applied directly to water.
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