02/23/2019
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  • 11:35 am Updated news about Bladen County Election Investigations
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  • 3:56 pm Letter to the Editor: Rebuttal to Sen. Thom Tillis’ Requests More Details From Administration On Offshore Drilling And Plans To Protect North Carolina
  • 2:33 pm State to hold last of two public meetings on draft Animal Feeding Operations General Permits
  • 2:03 pm Proposed legislation to make cell phone use while driving illegal in NC
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WASHINGTON, D.C. – U.S. Senator Thom Tillis (R-NC) introduced the Corolla Wild Horses Protection Act, legislation that would provide responsible management of the wild horse population around Corolla, North Carolina and the Outer Banks. Representative Walter Jones (R-NC) introduced companion legislation in the House of Representatives in previous Congresses and has been a long time champion of protecting the Corolla wild horse population.

“A cherished part of our state’s history and an admired attraction, thousands of tourists visit North Carolina’s beaches each year to witness the majestic nature of the Corolla horses,” said SenatorTillis. “This legislation will take the necessary and proper steps in protecting the health and safety of the wild animals and their habitat, while encouraging continued tourism and economic investment for our local coastal communities.”

The Corolla Wild Horses Protection Act would require the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the State of North Carolina, Currituck County and the Corolla Wild Horse Fund to craft a new management plan to care for the wild horses that inhabit the Outer Banks of North Carolina.

The Corolla wild horses do not exist anywhere else in the world. Their lineage can be traced back to the arrival of Spanish explorers on the Outer Banks in the 16th century. They are Colonial Spanish mustangs that have survived in the wild for the last four centuries and now roam across Currituck County, North Carolina.

This legislation is supported by the Humane Society and American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals.

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